Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering Effects of Training With Highly Agreed or Poorly Agreed Exemplars Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA. E-mail: sph1anne@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1295-1307. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1295
History: Received April 1, 1994 , Accepted June 30, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1295-1307. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1295
History: Received April 1, 1994; Accepted June 30, 1994

This study required six groups of judges, three experimental groups and three control groups (all n=5), to categorize consecutive 5.0-sec speech intervals as Stuttered or Nonstuttered on four judgment occasions. Between the second and third occasions, each experimental group was trained to categorize correctly one of three sets of speech intervals: agreed intervals, which had been unanimously prejudged to be Stuttered or Nonstuttered; disagreed intervals, which had been prejudged to be Stuttered by approximately half of a large group of judges; or randomly selected intervals, including both agreed and disagreed intervals. Results replicated and extended an earlier finding of improved interjudge agreement for judges trained with highly agreed intervals (Ingham, Cordes, & Gow, 1993): Training with highly agreed intervals was shown to be more effective than equivalent exposure to those intervals without feedback, and training with highly agreed intervals was shown to be more effective than training with, or exposure to, poorly agreed or randomly selected intervals.

Acknowledgments
The authors express their appreciation to the students and faculty of the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at California State University, Sacramento, and especially to Robert Hubbell. Thanks also to Richard Moglia, who provided technical support; to Peter Frank, who wrote the necessary software; and to Janis Ingham and Gregory Ashby, whose comments on an earlier report of this research helped to shape some of the lines of argument. This research was supported by funds from research grant number DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
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