Speech Rates and Turn-Taking Behaviors of Children Who Stutter and Their Fathers Paralinguistic behaviors, including speech rates and turn-taking behaviors, of boys who stutter and boys who do not stutter and their fathers were investigated. Subjects were 11 boys who stutter (mean age=5:1) and their fathers and 11 age-matched (±3 months) nonstuttering boys (mean age=5:1) and their fathers. Spontaneous conversational speech was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Speech Rates and Turn-Taking Behaviors of Children Who Stutter and Their Fathers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen M. Kelly
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Ellen M. Kelly, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, Heavilon Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353, E-mail 3k2@mace.cc.purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Speech Rates and Turn-Taking Behaviors of Children Who Stutter and Their Fathers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1284-1294. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1284
History: Received February 28, 1994 , Accepted June 27, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1284-1294. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1284
History: Received February 28, 1994; Accepted June 27, 1994

Paralinguistic behaviors, including speech rates and turn-taking behaviors, of boys who stutter and boys who do not stutter and their fathers were investigated. Subjects were 11 boys who stutter (mean age=5:1) and their fathers and 11 age-matched (±3 months) nonstuttering boys (mean age=5:1) and their fathers. Spontaneous conversational speech was obtained from each father and son during approximately 45 minutes of videotaped free play in a clinic setting. Measures of overall, articulatory, and dyadic speaking rates, interruptions, response time latencies, and disfluency characteristics were derived using the videotapes and computer-assisted analyses of the acoustic signal from each conversational sample. Two-factor repeated measures ANOVAs were performed on each of the paralinguistic variables for the 11 sets of age-matched father-son pairs. Fathers produced faster speaking rates, higher frequencies of interruptions and shorter response time latencies than sons. No significant differences were found in comparisons of the two groups of fathers or of the two groups of children for any of the paralinguistic behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between the SSI scores of children who stutter and the dyadic speaking rates of these children and their fathers. Results partially extend those of Kelly and Conture (1992) for mothers and children, but some potentially important differences emerge between fathers' and mothers' (para)linguistic behaviors in interaction with their children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by a Purdue Research Foundation Summer Faculty Grant and a School of Liberal Arts Faculty Incentive Grant from Purdue University. Special thanks are extended to Aileen Creagh, Lia Hajigeorgiou, Alix Koehler, Cindy Krizizke, Jane Martin, David McCoy, Diane Ogiela, R. Brian Owens, and June Stealy for their assistance with data collection and analysis, George McCabe and Julia Vasharvsky for their suggestions and assistance with statistical analyses, Anne Smith, Lisa Goffman, and Vicki Hammen, who reviewed an earlier version of this manuscript, and the journal reviewers, Ben Watson, Ehud Yairi, Frances Freeman, and Roger Ingham, who provided considerable food for thought and opportunity for growth to this author during the review process. Most importantly, gratitude is extended to the 22 father-child pairs who have furthered our understanding of paralinguistic behaviors in parent-child interactions.
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