Intelligibility and Nonspeech Orofacial Strength and Force Control Following Traumatic Brain Injury Objective measures of nonspeech orofacial strength and force control were obtained for 20 individuals with traumatic brain injury. The dynamic and static force generating abilities of the upper lip, lower lip, tongue, and jaw were assessed. Based on sentence intelligibility scores, the subjects were divided into two groups, more and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Intelligibility and Nonspeech Orofacial Strength and Force Control Following Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monica A. McHenry
    Galveston Institute of Human Communication, The Transitional Learning Community at Galveston, Galveston, TX
  • John T. Minton
    Galveston Institute of Human Communication, The Transitional Learning Community at Galveston, Galveston, TX
  • Robin L. Wilson
    Galveston Institute of Human Communication, The Transitional Learning Community at Galveston, Galveston, TX
  • Yolanda V. Post
    Galveston Institute of Human Communication, The Transitional Learning Community at Galveston, Galveston, TX
  • Contact author: Monica McHenry, PhD, Galveston Institute of Human Communication, Transitional Learning Community, 1528 Postoffice Street, Galveston, TX 77553.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Intelligibility and Nonspeech Orofacial Strength and Force Control Following Traumatic Brain Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1271-1283. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1271
History: Received May 5, 1993 , Accepted June 8, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1271-1283. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1271
History: Received May 5, 1993; Accepted June 8, 1994

Objective measures of nonspeech orofacial strength and force control were obtained for 20 individuals with traumatic brain injury. The dynamic and static force generating abilities of the upper lip, lower lip, tongue, and jaw were assessed. Based on sentence intelligibility scores, the subjects were divided into two groups, more and less intelligible. Force measures included reaction time, slope, derivative, peak overshoot, and first- and second-half mean hold and standard deviation. Groups differed only in the ability to sustain the 2 N force level with the tongue. Other potential contributors to the differences in intelligibility are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Moody Foundation Grant # 91-15. The authors gratefully acknowledge the insightful comments of Steven Barlow and Leila Hartley.
An early version of this work based on single-word intelligibility scores was presented at the 1992 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention.
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