Levator Veli Palatini Muscle Activity in Relation to Intraoral Air Pressure Variation The purpose of this investigation was to study the operating range of the levator veli palatini muscle for a nonspeech task (blowing) and to determine where in that range levator activity for speech lies. Ten adult subjects without speech or velopharyngeal abnormalities participated. Levator EMG activity for speech occurred in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Levator Veli Palatini Muscle Activity in Relation to Intraoral Air Pressure Variation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David P. Kuehn
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Jerald B. Moon
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact author: David P. Kuehn, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 901 S. Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: d-kuehn@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Levator Veli Palatini Muscle Activity in Relation to Intraoral Air Pressure Variation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1260-1270. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1260
History: Received September 10, 1993 , Accepted May 20, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1260-1270. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1260
History: Received September 10, 1993; Accepted May 20, 1994

The purpose of this investigation was to study the operating range of the levator veli palatini muscle for a nonspeech task (blowing) and to determine where in that range levator activity for speech lies. Ten adult subjects without speech or velopharyngeal abnormalities participated. Levator EMG activity for speech occurred in the lower region of the total range for blowing. In two subsequent experiments involving a subset of 4 subjects, it was found that overall effort may have had a small effect on levator activity apart from its role in velopharyngeal closure for aerodynamic purposes. The results of the main experiment are discussed in relation to the concept of threshold of fatigue as it may influence velopharyngeal control mechanisms.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by PHS Research Grants DC-00976, DC-00085, and DC-01015 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and DE-10436 from the National Institute of Dental Research. We would like to acknowledge the statistical support of the Biostatistics Core of the National Center for Voice and Speech and Wendy Edwards for her assistance in data analysis and graphics.
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