Linguistic Performance and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Persons Who Stutter In a series of studies regarding CNS dysfunction in stuttering, we have examined linguistic and motoric performance in the context of measures of brain function. Previous studies of adults with developmental stuttering identified alterations in brain function (metabolic and electrophysiologic) in cortical regions implicated in models of speech motor control ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Linguistic Performance and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Persons Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben C. Watson
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
  • Frances J. Freeman
    University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Michael D. Devous, Sr.
    University of Texas Southwestern, Medical Center, Dallas
  • Sandra B. Chapman
    University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Terese Finitzo
    Neuroscience Research Center, Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, TX
  • Kenneth D. Pool
    Neuroscience Research Center, Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, TX
  • Contact author: Ben C. Watson, PhD, Munger Clinical Sciences Pavilion, Rm. 171, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Linguistic Performance and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Persons Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1221-1228. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1221
History: Received August 13, 1993 , Accepted March 29, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1221-1228. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1221
History: Received August 13, 1993; Accepted March 29, 1994

In a series of studies regarding CNS dysfunction in stuttering, we have examined linguistic and motoric performance in the context of measures of brain function. Previous studies of adults with developmental stuttering identified alterations in brain function (metabolic and electrophysiologic) in cortical regions implicated in models of speech motor control and language processing. We also identified a sub-group of these subjects who exhibited linguistic performance deficits related to speech performance deficits. The present study examined the hypothesis that adults who stutter and who show linguistic performance deficits will also show metabolic alterations in cortical regions classically related to language processing, whereas adults who stutter but who do not show linguistic performance deficits will not show these cortical metabolic alterations. Significant relative blood flow asymmetry (left < right) was observed in middle temporal and inferior frontal cortical regions only for adults who both stuttered and showed linguistic performance deficits. Results support models that explicitly recognize that efficient integration of linguistic, motoric, and cognitive processes is critical to the production of oral/verbal fluency and to understanding sources of fluency failure.

Acknowledgments
Kay Stevens and Mari Hayashi assisted in conducting linguistic assessments. James Lowe and Kelly Payne conducted the rCBF SPECT studies. Funding was provided by NIH Grant NS 18276.
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