Detection of Irregular Verb Violations by Children With and Without SLI Fifty-seven children (ages in years;months: 5;7–8;8) with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI) participated in judgment and elicitation tasks designed to evaluate their understanding of restrictions associated with irregular verb forms. The performance of the SLI group was similar to the performances of the control groups in that all children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Detection of Irregular Verb Violations by Children With and Without SLI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond, PhD
    University of Utah, Department of Communication Disorders, 390 S. 1530 E., BEHS Room 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252
  • Mabel L. Rice
    University of Kansas Lawrence
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Detection of Irregular Verb Violations by Children With and Without SLI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 655-669. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/053)
History: Received August 16, 2000 , Accepted January 26, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 655-669. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/053)
History: Received August 16, 2000; Accepted January 26, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

Fifty-seven children (ages in years;months: 5;7–8;8) with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI) participated in judgment and elicitation tasks designed to evaluate their understanding of restrictions associated with irregular verb forms. The performance of the SLI group was similar to the performances of the control groups in that all children demonstrated high levels of sensitivity to violations involving verb-agreement errors (e.g., he am falling). The production and acceptance rates of past tense overregularizations (e.g., he falled) by the SLI and language-match groups were similar, and both were higher than the agematch group. Differences between affected and unaffected children were observed in their productions and relative levels of sensitivity to infinitive errors in finite positions (e.g., he fall off). As expected, children in the SLI group were more likely to produce and accept infinitive forms in finite positions. Children in the SLI group also accepted more finite form errors in VP complement positions (e.g., he made him fell) than the control groups, although the latter occurred rarely in children’s productions. Implications for understanding morphophonological and morphosyntactic development in children with SLI are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders award R01 DC01803 to Mabel Rice and Kenneth Wexler and T32 DC00052-02 awarded to Sean Redmond. The work presented here was conducted as part of the requirements of a doctoral degree at the University of Kansas awarded to Sean Redmond. We express special appreciation to Karla Rice, Chien Wang, Su-Dong Chen, and Candice Odle for assistance with data collection and reliability. We would also like to thank Diane Loeb for her generosity with her data. We are especially grateful for the support of the parents, who agreed to let their children participate in this investigation, and to the many teachers, school administrators, and daycare providers who assisted us in this study.
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