Predictive Inferencing in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage Predictive inferencing was evaluated in 13 adults with right hemisphere damage (RHD) and 11 adults without brain damage (NBD). Brief narrative stimuli that strongly suggested a single outcome were constructed to vary recency of mention of inference-related information. Reading times were recorded for narrative-final sentences that disconfirmed the target inferences. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Predictive Inferencing in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret T. Lehman-Blake, PhD
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders and University Center for Social and Urban Research University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
    Syracuse University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 805 S. Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244
  • Connie A. Tompkins
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders and University Center for Social and Urban Research University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mblake@syr.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY×
Article Information
Special Populations / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Predictive Inferencing in Adults With Right Hemisphere Brain Damage
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 639-654. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/052)
History: Received September 19, 2000 , Accepted January 19, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 639-654. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/052)
History: Received September 19, 2000; Accepted January 19, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 25

Predictive inferencing was evaluated in 13 adults with right hemisphere damage (RHD) and 11 adults without brain damage (NBD). Brief narrative stimuli that strongly suggested a single outcome were constructed to vary recency of mention of inference-related information. Reading times were recorded for narrative-final sentences that disconfirmed the target inferences. Slowed reading time on the final sentences was an indicator of inference generation. Adults with RHD generated target predictive inferences in contexts with recent mention of strongly biasing inference-related information. This group also evidenced maintenance of inferences over time, but to a lesser degree than participants in the NBD group. Overall, individuals with better auditory comprehension or larger estimated working memory capacity tended to maintain inferences better than did the other participants. The results are discussed in relation to current hypotheses of inferencing and discourse comprehension in adults with RHD.

Acknowledgments
This research was part of a doctoral dissertation completed at the University of Pittsburgh. Funding for this project was provided by a grant from the SHRS Research Development Fund, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, awarded to the first author, and by NIH/NIDCD grant #DC01820 awarded to the second author. We would like to acknowledge the many comments and suggestions from Christine Dollaghan, Mick McNeil, and Jonathan Schooler that helped to shape this project. Annette Baumgaertner, Wiltrud Fassbinder, Andy McMillin, and Connie Nojeim also provided assistance and support to various parts of this project. We are grateful to all of the participants for their continued interest in our projects and the donation of their time.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access