Effects of Frequency-Shifted Auditory Feedback on Fundamental Frequency of Long Stressed and Unstressed Syllables Twenty-four normally speaking subjects had to utter the test word /tatatas/with different stress patterns repeatedly. Auditory feedback was provided by headphones and was shifted downwards in frequency during randomly selected trials while the subjects were speaking the complete test word. If the first syllable was long stressed, fundamental frequency of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Frequency-Shifted Auditory Feedback on Fundamental Frequency of Long Stressed and Unstressed Syllables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ulrich Natke
    Institute of Experimental Psychology, Section of Cybernetical Psychology and Psychobiology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
  • Karl Theodor Kalveram
    Institute of Experimental Psychology, Section of Cybernetical Psychology and Psychobiology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Frequency-Shifted Auditory Feedback on Fundamental Frequency of Long Stressed and Unstressed Syllables
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 577-584. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/045)
History: Received August 9, 2000 , Accepted February 8, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 577-584. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/045)
History: Received August 9, 2000; Accepted February 8, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 47

Twenty-four normally speaking subjects had to utter the test word /tatatas/with different stress patterns repeatedly. Auditory feedback was provided by headphones and was shifted downwards in frequency during randomly selected trials while the subjects were speaking the complete test word. If the first syllable was long stressed, fundamental frequency of the vowel significantly increased by 2 Hz (corresponding to 25.5 cents) under frequency-shifted auditory feedback of .5 octave downwards, whereas under a shift of one semitone downwards a trend of an increase could be observed. If the first syllable was unstressed, fundamental frequency remained unaffected. Regarding the second syllable, significant increases or a trend for an increase of fundamental frequency was found in both shifting conditions. Results indicate a negative feedback mechanism that controls the fundamental frequency via auditory feedback in speech production. However, within a syllable a response could be found only if the syllable duration was long enough. Compensation for frequency-shifted auditory feedback still is quite imperfect. It is concluded that control of fundamental frequency is rather important on a suprasegmental level.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Deutsche For-schungsgemeinschaft (DFG), grant no. Ka 417/13–3. We want to thank Mrs. Juliane Grosser, who helped run the experiment, as well as Mrs. Anette Brechtel, for the preparation of the English version of this manuscript.
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