The Intelligibility of Time-Domain-Edited Esophageal Speech The intelligibility of esophageal speech has been shown to be significantly lower than that of normal laryngeal speech. The current study investigated the possibility of enhancing the intelligibility of esophageal speech by manipulating samples in the time domain. Specifically, injection noises and nonphrasal pauses were digitally edited from the speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
The Intelligibility of Time-Domain-Edited Esophageal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert A. Prosek, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University University Park
    Department of Communication Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 3F Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802.
  • Lori L. Vreeland
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rap6@psu.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Bedford Memorial Hospital, Everett, PA
    Currently affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Bedford Memorial Hospital, Everett, PA×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
The Intelligibility of Time-Domain-Edited Esophageal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 525-534. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/041)
History: Received September 22, 2000 , Accepted January 11, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 525-534. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/041)
History: Received September 22, 2000; Accepted January 11, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

The intelligibility of esophageal speech has been shown to be significantly lower than that of normal laryngeal speech. The current study investigated the possibility of enhancing the intelligibility of esophageal speech by manipulating samples in the time domain. Specifically, injection noises and nonphrasal pauses were digitally edited from the speech samples of 5 esophageal talkers. Twenty-five sentences were selected and edited in the time domain and presented to 15 naive listeners who were instructed to write down the words that they heard. The percentage of correct words heard for each sentence was determined and compared across listeners, sentences, and talkers. The overall effect of the editing was a small but significant gain in the intelligibility of the esophageal speech. The improvement in intelligibility, however, depended on the individual talker, the speech material, and the number of editing changes made to a particular sample.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the reviewers of this manuscript for their excellent and insightful comments.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access