Voice Activity and Participation Profile Assessing the Impact of Voice Disorders on Daily Activities Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Voice Activity and Participation Profile
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Estella P-M. Ma
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences The University of Hong Kong
  • Edwin M-L. Yiu, PhD
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences The University of Hong Kong
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, 5/F Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: edwinyiu@hku.hk
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Voice Activity and Participation Profile
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 511-524. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/040)
History: Received March 22, 2000 , Accepted January 11, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 511-524. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/040)
History: Received March 22, 2000; Accepted January 11, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 142

Traditional clinical voice evaluation focuses primarily on the severity of voice impairment, with little emphasis on the impact of voice disorders on the individual’s quality of life. This study reports the development of a 28-item assessment tool that evaluates the perception of voice problem, activity limitation, and participation restriction using the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps-2 Beta-1 concept (World Health Organization, 1997). The questionnaire was administered to 40 subjects with dysphonia and 40 control subjects with normal voices. Results showed that the dysphonic group reported significantly more severe voice problems, limitation in daily voice activities, and restricted participation in these activities than the control group. The study also showed that the perception of a voice problem by the dysphonic subjects correlated positively with the perception of limitation in voice activities and restricted participation. However, the self-perceived voice problem had little correlation with the degree of voice-quality impairment measured acoustically and perceptually by speech pathologists. The data also showed that the aggregate scores of activity limitation and participation restriction were positively correlated, and the extent of activity limitation and participation restriction was similar in all except the job area. These findings highlight the importance of identifying and quantifying the impact of dysphonia on the individual’s quality of life in the clinical management of voice disorders.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported in part by grants from the Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee (821007) and INSTEP, The University of Hong Kong. The authors would like to thank Dr Katherine Verdolini, Dr Alex Francis, Dr Maureen Higgins, and two anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments on the initial drafts of the manuscript.
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