Effects of Linguistic Cues and Stimulus Cohesion on Intelligibility of Severely Dysarthric Speech This study examined the effects of supplemental cues on the intelligibility of unrelated sentences and related sentences (narratives) produced by 4 women with severe dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy. Visual images containing alphabet, topic, combined (alphabet and topic together), and no cues were imposed in real time on audio speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Linguistic Cues and Stimulus Cohesion on Intelligibility of Severely Dysarthric Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine C. Hustad, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16803
  • David R. Beukelman
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders University of Nebraska Lincoln
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: kch2@psu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2001
Effects of Linguistic Cues and Stimulus Cohesion on Intelligibility of Severely Dysarthric Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 497-510. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/039)
History: Received October 2, 2000 , Accepted January 18, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2001, Vol. 44, 497-510. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/039)
History: Received October 2, 2000; Accepted January 18, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

This study examined the effects of supplemental cues on the intelligibility of unrelated sentences and related sentences (narratives) produced by 4 women with severe dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy. Visual images containing alphabet, topic, combined (alphabet and topic together), and no cues were imposed in real time on audio speech samples and presented to 72 nondisabled listeners. Statistical results showed that cue conditions had similar effects on unrelated and on related sentence intelligibility. Combined cues resulted in higher intelligibility scores than any other cue condition, no cues resulted in lower intelligibility scores than any other cue condition, and alphabet cues yielded higher intelligibility scores than topic cues. Intelligibility of related and unrelated sentences differed only for alphabet cues where related sentences had greater intelligibility than unrelated sentences. Results are discussed relative to the quantity and type of cues.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by funds from the Barkley Memorial Trust. The authors wish to express special thanks to the speakers with dysarthria who participated in this study and to Cara Ullman for preparation of stimulus tapes. In addition, the authors thank Jane Garica and two anonymous reviewers for helpful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented at the ASHA Convention in Washington DC, November 2000.
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