The Effect of Sampling Condition on Children’s Productions of Consonant Clusters An investigation was conducted to compare the effects of single word and connected speech sampling conditions on the production of consonant clusters. Speech samples were obtained from 40 children with speech sound impairments who were aged 3 years: 6 months to 5 years. The children’s productions of 36 commonly occurring ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
The Effect of Sampling Condition on Children’s Productions of Consonant Clusters
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharynne McLeod
    School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Linda Hand
    School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Joan B. Rosenthal
    School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Brett Hayes
    Department of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Australia
  • Contact author: Sharynne McLeod, School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe N.S.W. 2141, Australia. Email: s.mcleod@cchs.su.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
The Effect of Sampling Condition on Children’s Productions of Consonant Clusters
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 868-882. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.868
History: Received March 31, 1993 , Accepted February 16, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 868-882. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.868
History: Received March 31, 1993; Accepted February 16, 1994

An investigation was conducted to compare the effects of single word and connected speech sampling conditions on the production of consonant clusters. Speech samples were obtained from 40 children with speech sound impairments who were aged 3 years: 6 months to 5 years. The children’s productions of 36 commonly occurring consonant clusters were compared across the two sampling conditions. Overall, children’s productions were more similar than different. Differences between the sampling conditions were apparent for three of the eight phonological processes studied, namely, cluster reduction, final consonant deletion, and epenthesis. Of 12 fine phonetic variations, only aspirated stops showed a significant difference between the sampling conditions. There was a wide range of individual variation.

Acknowledgment
This study was part of a master’s thesis conducted by the first author in the School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney. The research was supported in part by a research grant from the Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney.
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