A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Language Development in Late Talkers This longitudinal investigation charted the course of cognitive and language development from the prelinguistic period to multiword productions in 19 typically developing (TD) toddlers and 4 toddlers who were subsequently identified as having late onset of expressive language. Assessments were conducted at 3-month intervals over a 21-month period, with 12 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Language Development in Late Talkers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development and Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Jamie Murray-Branch
    Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development and Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Jon F. Miller
    Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development and Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Susan Ellis Weismer, Waisman Center Rm. 473, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705-2280. email: SWEISMER@vms.macc.wisc.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Language Development in Late Talkers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 852-867. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.852
History: Received July 27, 1993 , Accepted February 16, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 852-867. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.852
History: Received July 27, 1993; Accepted February 16, 1994

This longitudinal investigation charted the course of cognitive and language development from the prelinguistic period to multiword productions in 19 typically developing (TD) toddlers and 4 toddlers who were subsequently identified as having late onset of expressive language. Assessments were conducted at 3-month intervals over a 21-month period, with 12 months of prospective assessment data comparing the TD and late talker (LT) subjects (mean CA: 13 to 25 months) and 9 months of follow-up data (mean CA: 25–34 months) on the 4 subjects who were identified as late talkers at age 2. Three different developmental profiles were identified, and predictors of expressive language outcomes for the LT subjects were evaluated.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the children who served as subjects and their parents for participating in this project. We want to acknowledge the contributions of Allison Sedey and Giuliana Miolo for their role in data collection and reduction in various phases of this project. Special thanks to Giuliana Miolo also for her expert assistance with graphic presentation of the data. Thanks to Linda Hesketh for her assistance with the Mest analyses. Individuals working in the SALT
Transcription Laboratory who transcribed the numerous language samples included Karen Koerber, Stephanie Cobbs-Woloshin, Barbara Wirka, and Christine Hollar. Finally, we would like to thank Holly Craig, Carol Stoel-Gammon, Donna Thal, and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. Partial funding for this project was provided by NIH grant R01 HD22393 awarded to Jon F. Miller and by NIH grant #1R29DC011 awarded to Susan Ellis Weismer.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access