Facilitating Prelinguistic Communication Skills in Young Children With Developmental Delay II Systematic Replication and Extension Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
Facilitating Prelinguistic Communication Skills in Young Children With Developmental Delay II
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder
    John F. Kennedy Center Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    John F. Kennedy Center Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Kyoungran Kim
    John F. Kennedy Center Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Gail E. Gazdag
    John F. Kennedy Center Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Paul J. Yoder, PhD, Box 328, Peabody at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37203. E-mail: yoderpj@ctrvax.vanderbilt.edu.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
Facilitating Prelinguistic Communication Skills in Young Children With Developmental Delay II
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 841-851. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.841
History: Received April 21, 1993 , Accepted January 26, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 841-851. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.841
History: Received April 21, 1993; Accepted January 26, 1994

Four children with mental retardation were studied in the context of a multiple baseline across subjects design. Staff members used a modified version of the milieu teaching method to facilitate intentional requesting. The results replicated the finding that a modified version of milieu teaching was effective in facilitating the use of intentional requesting by children with developmental delays in an intervention context (Warren, Yoder, Gazdag, Kim, & Jones, 1993). This study also extended the Warren et al. (1993)  work by (a) documenting that increased intentional requesting generalized to sessions with the children’s mothers, (b) demonstrating that mothers who were naive to the purposes of the study were more likely to linguistically map their children’s prelinguistic communication after the intervention than before the treatment, and (c) that mothers and teachers who were naive to the purposes of the study linguistically mapped the children’s intentional communication more than the children’s preintentional communication. We discuss implications of these results for early intervention, the transactional theory of development, and the importance of the distinction between intentional versus preintentional communication.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education (#HO23A10009). The authors would like to thank the staff of the Susan Gray School for Children for their contributions to this research.
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