Electropalatographic Data Collected With and Without a Face Mask This study investigates the extent to which the use of a face mask conveys linguopalatal contact changes during speech production. Electropalatographic data from five Catalan speakers were collected for different consonants, i.e., the alveolar stop In], the alveolopalatal stop [n] and the palatal approximant [j], in the sequences [iCi] and ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 1994
Electropalatographic Data Collected With and Without a Face Mask
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jordi Fontdevila
    Institut d’Estudis Catalans and Departament de Filologia Catalana Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain
  • Maria Dolors Pallarès
    Institut d’Estudis Catalans and Departament de Filologia Catalana Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain
  • Daniel Recasens
    Institut d’Estudis Catalans and Departament de Filologia Catalana Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Barcelona, Spain
  • Contact author: Daniel Recasens, Institut d–Estudis Catalans, % Carme, 47, Barcelona 08001, Spain. e-mail:ilft0@ccuab1.uab.es
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 1994
Electropalatographic Data Collected With and Without a Face Mask
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 806-812. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.806
History: Received May 5, 1993 , Accepted February 22, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 806-812. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.806
History: Received May 5, 1993; Accepted February 22, 1994

This study investigates the extent to which the use of a face mask conveys linguopalatal contact changes during speech production. Electropalatographic data from five Catalan speakers were collected for different consonants, i.e., the alveolar stop In], the alveolopalatal stop [n] and the palatal approximant [j], in the sequences [iCi] and [aCe]. Results for [n] indicate more closure retraction in the mask versus nonmask condition occurring presumably when the mask is pressed forcefully against the face in front of the mouth. The use of the mask for [n] and [j] causes an increase in dorsopalatal contact, which reflects most likely a strategy of articulatory and/or perceptual compensation.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by ESPRIT-BRA project 6975 “Speech Maps” and ESPRIT-BRA Working Group 7098 “Accor” from the EC, and by project DGICYT CE93-0020 of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science. We would like to thank Edda Farnetani, Fiona Gibbon, Katerina Nicolaidis and Bernard Teston for their help with the performance of the experiment and with the interpretation of the data.
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