Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering Effects of Interval Duration Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-7050.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 779-788. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.779
History: Received September 20, 1993 , Accepted March 10, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 779-788. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.779
History: Received September 20, 1993; Accepted March 10, 1994

The study reported in this article used a binary forced-choice judgment procedure to investigate the effects of sample duration on observers’ judgments of stuttering. Two groups of judges, differing in their previous experience with stuttering, categorized 270 speech intervals as stuttered or nonstuttered; the intervals were drawn from 30 persons who stuttered and ranged from 1 sec to 15 sec in duration. Results showed that judgments were consistently related to interval duration, with shorter intervals significantly more likely than longer intervals to be labeled nonstuttered. Interjudge agreement levels, however, were largely unaffected by the different interval durations for most speakers and for both judge groups, with the exception of the longest and shortest intervals drawn from speakers evidencing the mildest and most severe stuttering. An interval duration in the 3- to 5-sec region appeared to attract the most satisfactory level of agreement. The implications of these findings for interval-based clinical and experimental measurements of stuttering are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors express their sincere appreciation and thanks to the faculty and students of the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at California State University, Sacramento, and especially to Robert Hubbell. Thanks also to Richard Moglia, who provided technical support, and to Peter Frank, who wrote the necessary software. Some of the speech samples used for this study were drawn from a pool of recordings developed with assistance from Deborah Kully, Einer Boberg, Julia Boberg, and Richard Martin. This research was supported by grant number DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
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