Subjective Anxiety Measurements and Cortisol Responses in Adults Who Stutter Anxiety, as measured by self-report inventories and salivary cortisol levels, was examined in 11 males who stutter and 11 males who do not stutter during baseline, low stress, and high stress sessions. During the high stress session salivary cortisol was significantly greater in persons who stutter than in persons who ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
Subjective Anxiety Measurements and Cortisol Responses in Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Ingrid M. Blood
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Stephanie Bennett
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Kathleen C. Simpson
    Department of Communication Disorders The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Elizabeth J. Susman
    Departments of Biobehavioral Health, Human Development and Family Studies, and Nursing The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Gordon W. Blood, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 110 Moore Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
Subjective Anxiety Measurements and Cortisol Responses in Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 760-768. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.760
History: Received May 27, 1993 , Accepted February 15, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 760-768. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.760
History: Received May 27, 1993; Accepted February 15, 1994

Anxiety, as measured by self-report inventories and salivary cortisol levels, was examined in 11 males who stutter and 11 males who do not stutter during baseline, low stress, and high stress sessions. During the high stress session salivary cortisol was significantly greater in persons who stutter than in persons who do not stutter. No significant differences were found between the two groups on the State-Anxiety Inventory, Trait-Anxiety Inventory, or the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension. Significant differences in anxiety levels among the baseline, low stress, and high stress sessions for both groups of subjects were found for the State-Anxiety Inventory. No other significant differences or relationships were found between the two groups.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by funds from the Interdisciplinary Seed Grant Award, College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University, awarded to G. W. Blood, I. M. Blood, and E. J. Susman.
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