Adults Who Stutter Responses to Cognitive Stress Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1994
Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony J. Caruso
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Debra A. Bidinger
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Ronald K. Sommers
    Kent State University Kent, OH
  • Contact author: Anthony J. Caruso, PhD, Kent State University, Orofacial Motor Control Lab, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001. E-mail: ACARUSO@KENTVM.BITNET
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1994
Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 746-754. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.746
History: Received May 24, 1993 , Accepted January 10, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1994, Vol. 37, 746-754. doi:10.1044/jshr.3704.746
History: Received May 24, 1993; Accepted January 10, 1994

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of speed and cognitive stress on the articulatory coordination abilities of adults who stutter. Cardiovascular (heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure), behavioral (dysfluencies, errors, speech rate, and response latency), and acoustic (word duration, vowel duration, consonant-vowel transition duration/extent, and formant center frequency) measures for nine stutterers and nine nonstutterers were collected during performance of the Stroop Color Word task, a well-established and highly stressful cognitive task. Significant differences were found between the two groups for heart rate, word duration, vowel duration, speech rate, and response latency. In addition, stutterers produced more dysfluencies under speed plus cognitive stress versus speed stress or a self-paced reading task. These findings demonstrate that the presence of cognitive stress resulted in greater temporal disruptions and more dysfluencies for stutterers than for nonstutterers. However, similar spatial impairments were not evident. The potential contributions of the Stroop paradigm to stuttering research as well as the need for further research on autonomic correlates of stuttering are also discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge Xue Feng for her help with data collection and Vicki Neading for her excellent editorial assistance. This work was supported in part by a Summer Research Award from the Research Council of Kent and a Professional Development Award from the College of Fine & Professional Arts, Kent State University.
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