Speed of Processing in Children With Specific Language Impairment The aim of the present study was to investigate the speed with which children with specific language impairment (SLI) respond on a range of tasks. Seventy-seven third-grade children participated in 10 different tasks (involving a total of 41 conditions), including nonlinguistic and linguistic activities. Mean response times RTs) of children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
Speed of Processing in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol A. Miller
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Robert Kail
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: cam47@psu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
Speed of Processing in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 416-433. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/034)
History: Received October 7, 1999 , Accepted November 30, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 416-433. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/034)
History: Received October 7, 1999; Accepted November 30, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 224

The aim of the present study was to investigate the speed with which children with specific language impairment (SLI) respond on a range of tasks. Seventy-seven third-grade children participated in 10 different tasks (involving a total of 41 conditions), including nonlinguistic and linguistic activities. Mean response times RTs) of children with SLI (n=29) increased as a function of mean RTs of children with normal language (NLD, n=29) under each of three different regression models; children with SLI responded more slowly across all task conditions, and also when linguistic and nonlinguistic tasks were analyzed separately. Children with nonspecific language impairment (NLI) were also included (n=19). The results were similar to those for children with SLI, but the degree of slowing was greater. The results of the group analyses support the hypothesis that speed of processing in children with SLI is generally slower than that of children with normal language. However, some children with SLI do not appear to show deficits of this type.

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