SLD Is Not Stuttering Three related articles on stuttering that appeared in the October 1999 issue of the Journal (Paden, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999; Watkins, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999; Yairi & Ambrose, 1999)  are impressive with respect to the extent of the undertaking. However, the findings in each report are vitiated in ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 2001
SLD Is Not Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcel E. Wingate
    Washington State University Pullman
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Language / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 2001
SLD Is Not Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 381-383. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/031)
History: Received March 23, 2000 , Accepted July 25, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 381-383. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/031)
History: Received March 23, 2000; Accepted July 25, 2000
Three related articles on stuttering that appeared in the October 1999 issue of the Journal (Paden, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999; Watkins, Yairi, & Ambrose, 1999; Yairi & Ambrose, 1999)  are impressive with respect to the extent of the undertaking. However, the findings in each report are vitiated in their significance for stuttering by a serious flaw common to all three studies.
The flaw lies in the focal criterion for subject selection, namely “Stutter-Like Disfluencies.” The critical word is like, which in this (not uncommon) usage means “resembling.” Briefly put, “stutter-like” is not stutter. However, as stated in each title and as indicated in the authors' narratives, these articles purport to present evidence pertinent to stuttering.
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