The Young Child's Awareness of Stuttering-Like Disfluency The emergence of awareness of stuttering has been an important factor in theoretical and clinical considerations for early childhood stuttering. The present research program is aimed at studying the development of awareness of stuttering-like disfluency in normally fluent preschool and first-grade children using responses to video speech samples. A total ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
The Young Child's Awareness of Stuttering-Like Disfluency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour
    Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
  • Rozanne Platzky
    Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Ruthez@post.tau.ac.il
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
The Young Child's Awareness of Stuttering-Like Disfluency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 368-380. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/030)
History: Received June 1, 2000 , Accepted January 4, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 368-380. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/030)
History: Received June 1, 2000; Accepted January 4, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 47

The emergence of awareness of stuttering has been an important factor in theoretical and clinical considerations for early childhood stuttering. The present research program is aimed at studying the development of awareness of stuttering-like disfluency in normally fluent preschool and first-grade children using responses to video speech samples. A total of 79 children in five different age groups were asked to discriminate between the speech (fluent and disfluent) of two puppets, identify with the one who speaks like them, and evaluate the disfluent and fluent speech of the puppets. It was found that from age 3, children show evidence of awareness of the disfluency used in the study, but most children reached full awareness at age 5. Also, negative evaluation of disfluent speech is observed from age 4. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the children who participated in this investigation. Dr. Yairi’s contribution to this study was in conjunction with his grant #2 R01 DC00459 from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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