Acoustic Discrimination of Pathological Voice Sustained Vowels Versus Continuous Speech Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
Acoustic Discrimination of Pathological Voice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vijay Parsa
    National Centre for Audiology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • Donald G. Jamieson
    National Centre for Audiology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jamieson@nca.uwo.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
Acoustic Discrimination of Pathological Voice
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 327-339. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/027)
History: Received July 17, 2000 , Accepted December 11, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 327-339. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/027)
History: Received July 17, 2000; Accepted December 11, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 116

We investigated the ability of acoustic measures to discriminate between normal and pathological talkers. Two groups of measures were compared: (a) those extracted from sustained vowels and (b) those based on continuous speech samples. Nine acoustic measures, which include fundamental frequency and amplitude perturbation measures, long term average spectral measures, and glottal noise measures were extracted from both sustained vowel and continuous speech samples. Our experiments were performed on a published database of 53 normal talkers and 175 talkers with a pathological voice. The classification performance of the nine acoustic measures was quantified using linear discriminant analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. When individual measures were considered in isolation, classification was more accurate for measures extracted from sustained vowels than for those based on continuous speech samples. Classification accuracy improved when combinations of acoustic parameters were considered. For such combinations of measures, classification results were comparable for measures extracted from continuous speech samples and for those based on sustained vowels.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Ontario Rehabilitation Technology Consortium, and Canadian Foundation for Innovation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access