The Effects of Masseter Tendon Vibration on Nonspeech Oral Movements and Vowel Gestures The role of proprioception in speech and oral motor control was investigated by applying tendon vibration to the masseter during vowel production and nonspeech oral movements. Measures were made of peak jaw-opening amplitude, jaw-opening velocity, and movement time in both vibration and nonvibration conditions. Generally, the tendon vibration caused a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
The Effects of Masseter Tendon Vibration on Nonspeech Oral Movements and Vowel Gestures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Torrey M. J. Loucks
    University of Toronto The Toronto Western Research Institute Toronto, Ontario Canada
  • Luc F. De Nil
    University of Toronto The Toronto Western Research Institute Toronto, Ontario Canada
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: luc.denil@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
The Effects of Masseter Tendon Vibration on Nonspeech Oral Movements and Vowel Gestures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 306-316. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/025)
History: Received July 11, 2000 , Accepted December 6, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2001, Vol. 44, 306-316. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/025)
History: Received July 11, 2000; Accepted December 6, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

The role of proprioception in speech and oral motor control was investigated by applying tendon vibration to the masseter during vowel production and nonspeech oral movements. Measures were made of peak jaw-opening amplitude, jaw-opening velocity, and movement time in both vibration and nonvibration conditions. Generally, the tendon vibration caused a consistent and marked reduction in the amplitude and velocity of jaw-opening movements for each subject in both tasks. Movement time remained consistent across the vibration conditions for both tasks. These results indicate that masseter tendon vibration causes significant changes in jaw kinematics during simple speech gestures and nonspeech movements. These findings are consistent with the documented effects of tendon vibration on limb movements. The study demonstrates that tendon vibration is a potent tool for investigating proprioception in speech and oral motor control.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to express thanks to the individuals who participated in the experiment and to Sophie Lafaille and Jayanthi Sasisekeran for assisting with analysis and editing. This research was funded by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to the second author.
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