Comments Regarding the Investigation of Developmental Apraxia of Speech Response to Shriberg, Aram, and Kwiatkowski Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 1998
Comments Regarding the Investigation of Developmental Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claire M. Waldron
    Radford University Radford, Virginia
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 1998
Comments Regarding the Investigation of Developmental Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 958-960. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.958
History: Received June 30, 1997 , Accepted February 16, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 958-960. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.958
History: Received June 30, 1997; Accepted February 16, 1998

The conclusions and discussion were based on only 16 children who were identified based on clearly described criteria. Those subjects have widely varying ages, unspecified treatment histories, and varying receptive language status. The authors did not claim that these results are generalizable to a larger population of children, but I fear that their results will be interpreted that way by others. Identifying unusual phrasal stress deficits in 8 of 16 children with suspected DAS should not be construed or implied as evidence for a diagnostic marker for a subtype of DAS.

I strongly agree with the authors that longitudinal studies of children with persistent and unusual speech disorders are needed. Studies concerning children's responses to treatment are also needed. Although models of adult onset apraxia (AOS) may provide useful procedures for measuring or describing speech and nonspeech characteristics of DAS, using AOS as a theoretical model or clinical analogy to DAS leads us to ask less relevant questions about children with unusual and persistent speech disorders. Children with suspected DAS are different from adults who have AOS. Children who have never spoken normally or used language normally are different from adults who have acquired a speech disorder after decades of using spoken and written language normally. In order to intervene efficiently and appropriately, we need to know whether and how children with DAS differ from other children, not how they might resemble adults with an acquired disorder.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access