The Perception of Correctly and Incorrectly Produced /r/ Twenty-six children and adolescents who were unable to produce /r/ correctly were administered a listening task. They were asked to listen to a tape of 200 words containing /r/ in a variety of contexts. Half of the words had been produced by the subjects themselves and half by another speaker ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
The Perception of Correctly and Incorrectly Produced /r/
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda I. Shuster
    West Virginia University
  • Contact author: Linda I. Shuster, PO Box 6122, 805 Allen Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506. Email u5050@wvnvm.wvnet.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
The Perception of Correctly and Incorrectly Produced /r/
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 941-950. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.941
History: Received September 6, 1996 , Accepted November 18, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 941-950. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.941
History: Received September 6, 1996; Accepted November 18, 1997

Twenty-six children and adolescents who were unable to produce /r/ correctly were administered a listening task. They were asked to listen to a tape of 200 words containing /r/ in a variety of contexts. Half of the words had been produced by the subjects themselves and half by another speaker who produced /r/ incorrectly. In addition, half of the words from each speaker contained an /r/ that was incorrect whereas the other half contained an /r/ that was edited so that it sounded correct. Subjects made judgments for each word regarding the correctness of the /r/ and the identity of the speaker. Subjects performed significantly more poorly in judging their own incorrect utterances than on any other category of utterance. When judging their own "corrected" utterances, they were more successful at deciding whether the /r/ was correct than in identifying the identity of the speaker. The results provide support for a relationship between speech perception and production in some individuals with a phonological disorder.

Acknowledgments
Supported in part by research grant 5 R03 DC 01742-02 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The author gratefully acknowledges Carolyn Wilbourn, Janet Stone, Carolyn Frankhouser, Brenda Blankenship, Lucien Scarville, Linda Glagola, Janice Sonson, and Lu Waters for their help in subject recruitment. Thanks also to Marie Hillstrom and Magdalena Niewadomska-Bugaj for their help with data analysis and to Ken St. Louis, Julie Wambaugh, Chuck Woodford, John Durrant, Karen Pollock, and an anonymous reviewer for their comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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