Negotiation skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment This study examined the ability of 6 children with specific language impairment (SLI), ages 8;10 to 12;5 (yr; mon) to participate in a negotiation sequence with 2 same-age peers in triadic interactions. Negotiation sequences were analyzed using a system based on Selman’s interpersonal negotiation strategies (INS) model (Selman, 1981). The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
Negotiation skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Lara McKee
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Bonnie Brinton, PhD, Brigham Young University, 343 MCKB, P.O. Box 25095, Provo, UT 84602-5095
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
Negotiation skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 927-940. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.927
History: Received January 14, 1997 , Accepted November 14, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 927-940. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.927
History: Received January 14, 1997; Accepted November 14, 1997

This study examined the ability of 6 children with specific language impairment (SLI), ages 8;10 to 12;5 (yr; mon) to participate in a negotiation sequence with 2 same-age peers in triadic interactions. Negotiation sequences were analyzed using a system based on Selman’s interpersonal negotiation strategies (INS) model (Selman, 1981). The negotiation skills of children with SLI were compared to those of 6 children matched for chronological age (CA) and 6 children of similar language (LS) abilities, participating in the same task. Children with SLI did not produce significantly fewer utterances than the partners with whom they interacted. However, they did produce a significantly smaller percentage of the negotiation strategies produced by their triads. They also used developmentally lower level strategies than either of the partners in their triads. Children interacting within the CA and LS triads did not produce similar differences.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge the support of the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Julie C. Spencer, Lee Robinson, and the Alpine School District for their help in subject selection and data collection.
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