Comments on Dagenais, Cox, Southwood, and Smith (1997) This letter is offered in response to the article, “Vocal Reaction Times of Children with CAPD, Age-Matched Peers, and Young Adults to Printed Words, ” by Dagenais, Cox, Southwood, and Smith (1997)  in a previous issue of this journal. We are encouraged to see interest in how individuals diagnosed with ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 1998
Comments on Dagenais, Cox, Southwood, and Smith (1997)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen L. Condouris
    Holliston Schools Holliston, Massachusetts
  • Allan B. Smith
    Palmer Schools Palmer, Massachusetts
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Hearing / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 1998
Comments on Dagenais, Cox, Southwood, and Smith (1997)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 859-860. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.859
History: Received September 8, 1997 , Accepted March 31, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 859-860. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.859
History: Received September 8, 1997; Accepted March 31, 1998
This letter is offered in response to the article, “Vocal Reaction Times of Children with CAPD, Age-Matched Peers, and Young Adults to Printed Words, ” by Dagenais, Cox, Southwood, and Smith (1997)  in a previous issue of this journal. We are encouraged to see interest in how individuals diagnosed with Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD) perform on non-auditory tasks outside a typical CAPD test battery. The results indicate that deficits are not confined to the auditory modality. Our comments are in general agreement with Dagenais et al., but we wish to elaborate on one possible explanation for their results. In our opinion, the performance patterns associated with CAPD are disturbingly similar to patterns associated with other, more generalized dysfunctions. As Speech-Language Pathologists, we are especially interested in the possibility that language dysfunctions underlie the symptomatology of CAPD. Our purpose in writing this letter is to emphasize two points: (a) that language disorders could be mistakenly identified as CAPD, or vice versa, and (b) that language dysfunctions would explain the performance of CAPD-identified subjects in the Dagenais et al. study.
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