Improvements in Speech Perception by Children With Profound Prelingual Hearing Loss Effects of Device, Communication Mode, and Chronological Age Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
Improvements in Speech Perception by Children With Profound Prelingual Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ted A. Meyer
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Mario A. Svirsky
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Karen I. Kirk
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Richard T. Miyamoto
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Contact author: Ted A. Meyer, MD, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, DeVault Otologic Research Laboratory, 702 Barnhill Drive, RR-044, Indianapolis, IN 46202. Email: tmeyer@iupui.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
Improvements in Speech Perception by Children With Profound Prelingual Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 846-858. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.846
History: Received July 24, 1997 , Accepted March 3, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 846-858. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.846
History: Received July 24, 1997; Accepted March 3, 1998

The present investigation expanded on an earlier study by Miyamoto, Osberger, Todd, Robbins, Karasek, et al. (1994)  who compared the speech perception skills of two groups of children with profound prelingual hearing loss. The first group had received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant and was tested longitudinally. The second group, who were not implanted and used conventional hearing aids, was tested at a single point in time. In the present study, speech perception scores were examined over time for both groups of children as a function of communication mode of the child. Separate linear regressions of speech perception scores as a function of age were computed to estimate the rate of improvement in speech perception abilities that might be expected due to maturation for the hearing aid users (n=58) within each communication mode. The resulting regression lines were used to compare the estimated rate of speech perception growth for each hearing aid group to the observed gains in speech perception made by the children with multichannel cochlear implants. A large number of children using cochlear implants (n=74) were tested over a long period of implant use (m=3.5 years) that ranged from zero to 8.5 years. In general, speech perception scores for the children using cochlear implants were higher than those predicted for a group of children with 101–110 dB HL of hearing loss using hearing aids, and they approached the scores predicted for a group of children with 90–100 dB HL of hearing loss using hearing aids.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by NIH/NIDCD Grant DC 00064 and NIH Training Grant DC 00012. Portions of the paper were presented at the 20th Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, St. Petersburg Beach, FL, February, 1997. We would like to thank Amy M. Robbins, Susan T. Sehgal, and Allyson I. Riley for help in data collection, Theresa S. Kerr for help in data organization, and Linette A. Caldwell for clerical assistance. We would also like to thank Drs. David B. Pisoni, Steven B. Chin, and the reviewers for their helpful comments.
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