Stuttering, Stressed Syllables, and Word Onsets The relationship of syllabic stress, word onsets, and stuttering was examined on selected words within a set of 40 carefully controlled sentences containing bisyllabic words with contrastive stress. Ten stuttering adults displayed significantly more stuttering on the word-initial syllables than on the subsequent (word-final) syllables, whereas stressed syllables were not ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 1998
Stuttering, Stressed Syllables, and Word Onsets
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol P. Hubbard
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Contact Author: Carol P. Hubbard, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, 859 Enderis Hall, Milwaukee, WI 53201. e-mail: chubbard@uwm.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 1998
Stuttering, Stressed Syllables, and Word Onsets
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 802-808. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.802
History: Received April 7, 1997 , Accepted March 30, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 802-808. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.802
History: Received April 7, 1997; Accepted March 30, 1998

The relationship of syllabic stress, word onsets, and stuttering was examined on selected words within a set of 40 carefully controlled sentences containing bisyllabic words with contrastive stress. Ten stuttering adults displayed significantly more stuttering on the word-initial syllables than on the subsequent (word-final) syllables, whereas stressed syllables were not stuttered significantly more than unstressed syllables. Participants displayed a greater tendency to stutter on word-onsets than stressed syllables within words. These findings are discussed with respect to potential relationships of stutter events to layers of metrical structure associated with speech production.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank Lisa Knudten for the time she spent identifying stuttering loci and stressed syllables for each subject on every sentence, supplying measures for interjudge reliability. The author also thanks the editorial consultants of JSLHR for their helpful suggestions toward the preparation of this manuscript.
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