Guidelines for Documentation of Treatment Efficacy for Young Children Who Stutter The pressing need to document treatment efficacy for young children who stutter is discussed. Guidelines for such documentation are suggested and illustrated. Measures for verifying treatment effects in four realms are delineated: (a) conditions of documentation, (b) dependent variables to be measured, (c) establishment of treatment integrity, and (d) verification ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
Guidelines for Documentation of Treatment Efficacy for Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janis Costello Ingham
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Glyndon Riley
    Department of Speech Communication California State University, Fullerton
  • Contact author: Janis Costello Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Email: <jcingham@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu>
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
Guidelines for Documentation of Treatment Efficacy for Young Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 753-770. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.753
History: Received February 19, 1997 , Accepted March 3, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 753-770. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.753
History: Received February 19, 1997; Accepted March 3, 1998

The pressing need to document treatment efficacy for young children who stutter is discussed. Guidelines for such documentation are suggested and illustrated. Measures for verifying treatment effects in four realms are delineated: (a) conditions of documentation, (b) dependent variables to be measured, (c) establishment of treatment integrity, and (d) verification of the relationship between treatment and outcome. Illustrations of the application of the suggested guidelines are presented for 2 children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH Grant No. 5 RO1 DC01100-02, awarded from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors would like to thank Roberta Jackson Shough, who served in roles too many to describe, all of which were crucial to the conduct and completion of this research; Richard Moglia whose technical assistance was invaluable; Shannon Bryan, Melinda Harold, Robin Hauge, Jill Hayward, Karen Zwicke, and Jeannine Bankey, all of whom served competently and enthusiastically as clinicians and data recorders; and Ehud Yairi, for valuable feedback on previous versions of the manuscript.
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