DECTalk and MacinTalk Speech Synthesizers Intelligibility Differences for Three Listener Groups Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1998
DECTalk and MacinTalk Speech Synthesizers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine C. Hustad
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Ray D. Kent
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • David R. Beukelman
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Contact author: Katherine C. Hustad, Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 253 Barkley Memorial Center, Lincoln, NE 68583-0731. Email: khustad@unlinfo.unl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1998
DECTalk and MacinTalk Speech Synthesizers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 744-752. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.744
History: Received March 31, 1997 , Accepted February 13, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1998, Vol. 41, 744-752. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4104.744
History: Received March 31, 1997; Accepted February 13, 1998

This study examined word level intelligibility differences between DECTalk and MacinTalk speech synthesizers using the Modified Rhyme Test in an open format transcription task. Three groups of listeners participated: inexperienced, speech-language pathologists, and speech synthesis experts. Results for between-subjects ANOVA showed that the expert group correctly identified a significantly higher number of words than each of the other listener groups. For the within-subjects factor of voice, simple effects ANOVA and post hoc contrasts within each group showed that listeners had higher intelligibility scores for the DECTalk male voice, Perfect Paul, than for the MacinTalk male voice, Bruce. No other pairwise gender/age-matched differences were found between the two synthesizers.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by NIH research grant DC00319 (“Intelligibility Studies of Dysarthria”) awarded to the second author from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.
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