Perceptions of Simulated Stuttering and Fluency This study explored multiple effects of listener perceptions of different levels of simulated stuttering and fluency. A single stuttered speech sample was modified to create four additional samples of stuttering and fluency. A sixth sample of a nonstuttered signal served as a comparative baseline. Each of 60 independent listeners made ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Perceptions of Simulated Stuttering and Fluency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Susca
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Contact author: Michael Susca, MS, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, 253 Barkley Memorial Center, P.O. Box 830732, Lincoln, NE 68583-0731. Email: msusca1@bigred.unl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Perceptions of Simulated Stuttering and Fluency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 61-72. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/006)
History: Received March 30, 2000 , Accepted October 13, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 61-72. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/006)
History: Received March 30, 2000; Accepted October 13, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

This study explored multiple effects of listener perceptions of different levels of simulated stuttering and fluency. A single stuttered speech sample was modified to create four additional samples of stuttering and fluency. A sixth sample of a nonstuttered signal served as a comparative baseline. Each of 60 independent listeners made quantitative and qualitative perceptual judgments upon hearingonly one of the six randomly assigned samples. Results showed a broad spectrum of qualitative and quantitative listener perceptions of the various levels of stuttering and fluency studied. Likert scale data revealed that listeners gave lower ratings to samples with increased levels of stuttering. Listener commentaries revealed fewer positive comments with increased levels of stuttering and distinctivepreferences between two 0% samples of stuttering where only prosodic features were modified. Additionally, specific perceptions of speaker competency, perceived ease in reading a passage, general comfort listening, and perceived effort in understanding the story appear to affect the global perceptions of a speaker's communication. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this manuscript were presented at the 1999 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Francisco. We would like to thank Kara Mulloy and Kendra Speece for their contributions in collecting and analyzing some of the data for this project. We would also like to thank Dr. Tom Carrell for his assistance with the digital processing of our speech samples.
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