Effects of Vowel Height and Vocal Intensity on Anticipatory Nasal Airflow in Individuals With Normal Speech The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of vowel height and vocal intensity on the magnitude of anticipatory nasal airflow in normal speakers when producing vowel-nasal-vowel (VNV) sequences. Measurements of nasal and oral airflow were obtained from 15 men and 12 women with normal speech during production ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Effects of Vowel Height and Vocal Intensity on Anticipatory Nasal Airflow in Individuals With Normal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa H. Young
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • David J. Zajac
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Robert Mayo
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Celia R. Hooper
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Lisa H. Young, MS, Coordinator, Speech Science Laboratory, Center for Craniofacial Disorders, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, 5455 Meridian Mark, Ste. 420, Atlanta, GA 30342-1600. Email: lisa.young@choa.org
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Effects of Vowel Height and Vocal Intensity on Anticipatory Nasal Airflow in Individuals With Normal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 52-60. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/005)
History: Received April 12, 2000 , Accepted October 3, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 52-60. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/005)
History: Received April 12, 2000; Accepted October 3, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of vowel height and vocal intensity on the magnitude of anticipatory nasal airflow in normal speakers when producing vowel-nasal-vowel (VNV) sequences. Measurements of nasal and oral airflow were obtained from 15 men and 12 women with normal speech during production of the VNV sequences /ini/ and /αnα/ at low, medium, and high intensity levels. Ratios of nasal to oral-plus-nasal airflow were calculated for the initial vowel of both utterances at each of the intensity levels. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures indicated a significant main effect of intensity level and a significant vowel-by-sex interaction effect (p < .05) on the airflow ratios. Overall, the airflow ratio was reduced at high as compared to low intensity levels, regardless of sex of the speaker or vowel type. Female speakers exhibited greater airflow ratios during production of /ini/ than during productions of /αnα/. Their airflow ratios were also greater during production of /ini/ than were those of male speakers. The results suggest that vocal intensity may affect velopharyngeal (VP) function in an assimilative nasal phonetic context. The results further suggest that anticipatory nasal airflow may be determined by the configuration of the oral cavity to a greater extent in women than in men. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This paper is based in part on a masters thesis completed by the first author while at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The authors thank Richard Lutz for his invaluable assistance with software programming of the PERCI-SARS system. We also thank Ronald Nettsell and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful reviews of an earlier version of the manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual Meetings of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1997, San Antonio, TX, and the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, April 1998, Baltimore, MD. The work was supported in part by NIH Grant R29-DE10175 to the second author.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access