Enhanced Speechreading in Deaf Adults Can Short-Term Training/Practice Close the Gap for Hearing Adults? Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Enhanced Speechreading in Deaf Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynne E. Bernstein
    Center for Auditory and Speech Sciences Gallaudet University Washington, DC
  • Edward T. Auer, Jr.
    Center for Auditory and Speech Sciences Gallaudet University Washington, DC
  • Paula E. Tucker
    Center for Auditory and Speech Sciences Gallaudet University Washington, DC
  • Contact author: Lynne Bernstein, PhD, Department of Communication Neuroscience, House Ear Institute, 2100 W. Third Street, Los Angeles, CA 90057. Email: lbernstein@hei.org
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Enhanced Speechreading in Deaf Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 5-18. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/001)
History: Received January 19, 1999 , Accepted November 11, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 5-18. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/001)
History: Received January 19, 1999; Accepted November 11, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

This study investigated effects of short-term training/practice on group and individual differences in deaf and hearing speechreaders. In two experiments, participants speechread sentences with feedback during training and without feedback during testing, alternating 10 times over six sessions spanning up to 5 weeks. Testing used sentence sets balanced for expected mean performance. In each experiment, participants were adults who reported good speechreading and either normal hearing (n= 8) or severe to profound hearing impairments (n=8). The experiments were replicates, except that in one participants received vibrotactile speech stimuli in addition to visible speech during training, testing whether vibrotactile speech enhances speechreading learning. Results showed that (a) training/practice did not alter the relative performance among individuals or groups; (b) significant learning occurred when training and testing were conducted with speechreading only (although the magnitude of the effect was small); and (c) there was evidence that the vibrotactile training depressed rather than raised speechreading scores over the training period.

Acknowledgments
We thank Brian Chaney for his assistance in processing data and Sven Mattys, PhD, for commenting on the paper. A subset of the results was presented at Auditory-Visual Speech Processing, 1998, Terrigal, New South Wales, Australia. The research was supported by grants from NIH/ NIDCD DC01207 and DC00695.
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