Durational, Proportionate, and Absolute Frequency Characteristics of Disfluencies A Longitudinal Study Regarding Persistence and Recovery Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Durational, Proportionate, and Absolute Frequency Characteristics of Disfluencies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Niermann Throneburg
    University of Illinois Urbana
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois Urbana
  • Contact author: Rebecca Throneburg, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, 600 Lincoln Ave, Charleston IL, 61920. Email: rmthroneburg@eiu.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
    Currently affiliated with Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Durational, Proportionate, and Absolute Frequency Characteristics of Disfluencies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 38-51. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/004)
History: Received January 28, 2000 , Accepted July 14, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 38-51. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/004)
History: Received January 28, 2000; Accepted July 14, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

The main objective of this study was to investigate developmental aspects of disfluencies over time as stuttering persists or ameliorates for 2 groups of preschool age children who stutter. Results indicated that the frequency, type, and duration of disfluencies remained relatively constant instead of increasing as expected in the persistent group over a 3-year period. In contrast, the recovered group's initially higher frequency of disfluency decreased over time, as did their number of repetition units and proportion of disrhythmic phonations, while the duration of silent intervals between repetition units and proportion of monosyllabic word repetitions increased.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute On Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Grant 2 RO1 DC00459, principal investigator, Ehud Yairi.
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