A Quantitative Output-Cost Ratio in Voice Production A quantitative output-cost ratio (OCR) is proposed for objective use in voice production and is defined as the ratio of the acoustic output intensity to the collision intensity of the vocal folds. Measurement of the OCR is demonstrated in a laboratory experiment using 5 excised larynges and a transducer designed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
A Quantitative Output-Cost Ratio in Voice Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Berry
    The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
  • Katherine Verdolini
    Harvard Medical School Boston, MA
  • Douglas W. Montequin
    The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
  • Markus M. Hess
    University of Hamburg Hamburg, Germany
  • Roger W. Chan
    The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
  • Ingo R. Titze
    The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
  • Contact author: David A. Berry, PhD, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, 31-24 Rehab Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1794
    Contact author: David A. Berry, PhD, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, 31-24 Rehab Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1794×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
A Quantitative Output-Cost Ratio in Voice Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 29-37. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/003)
History: Received February 27, 2000 , Accepted May 10, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 29-37. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/003)
History: Received February 27, 2000; Accepted May 10, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 42

A quantitative output-cost ratio (OCR) is proposed for objective use in voice production and is defined as the ratio of the acoustic output intensity to the collision intensity of the vocal folds. Measurement of the OCR is demonstrated in a laboratory experiment using 5 excised larynges and a transducer designed for use on human subjects. Data were gathered at constant fundamental frequency (150 Hz). Subglottal pressure was varied from 1.0 to 1.6 kPa, and glottal width at the vocal processes was varied from a pressed condition to a 2-mm gap. The OCR was plotted as a function of glottal width. With no vocal tract, the excised larynx experiments yielded a broad maxima in the OCR curves, across all subglottal pressure conditions, at about 0.6 mm. Computer simulations indicate that sharper maxima may occur when the influence of the vocal tract is taken into account. The potential clinical utility of the OCR is discussed for treatment of a wide range of voice disorders, including those involving both hyper- and hypoadduction.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by grant numbers R29 DC03072, 1 K08 DC00139, and P60 DC00976 and from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The design for the transducer used in this experiment was proposed by the late Tom McMahon of Harvard. The sensor tip was manufactured by Heinz Roesler and refined by Wolfgang Bierhals, both of the ENT Clinic of the Benjamin Franklin Medical Center, Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
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