Relative Treatment Effects of Two Prelinguistic Communication Interventions on Language Development in Toddlers With Developmental Delays Vary by Maternal Characteristics This paper tests whether two prelinguistic communication interventions have a differential effect on productive and receptive language development 6 and 12 months after the end of treatment. We predicted that treatment effects on language development would vary as a function of pretreatment maternal responsivity or amount of mothers' formal education. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Relative Treatment Effects of Two Prelinguistic Communication Interventions on Language Development in Toddlers With Developmental Delays Vary by Maternal Characteristics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    The University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Contact author: Paul Yoder, PhD, GPC Box 328, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 37203. Email: paul.yoder@vanderbilt.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Relative Treatment Effects of Two Prelinguistic Communication Interventions on Language Development in Toddlers With Developmental Delays Vary by Maternal Characteristics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 224-237. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/019)
History: Received June 1, 1999 , Accepted November 21, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 224-237. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/019)
History: Received June 1, 1999; Accepted November 21, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 52

This paper tests whether two prelinguistic communication interventions have a differential effect on productive and receptive language development 6 and 12 months after the end of treatment. We predicted that treatment effects on language development would vary as a function of pretreatment maternal responsivity or amount of mothers' formal education. Fifty-eight prelinguistic children with developmental delays and their mothers participated in the study. Children were randomly assigned to one of two staff-implemented treatments that were designed to increase intentional communication ability. Results confirmed the prediction that treatment effects on children's receptive and expressive language 6 and 12 months after the end of interventions vary as a function of pretreatment maternal responsivity and education level.

Acknowledgments
Sincere thanks are given to Heather Biggar, Carol Chapman, Melissa Crim, Sandy Cooper, Dawn Denniston, Anne Edwards, Kim Gilbert, Dana Oman, Betsy Reineke, Martha Shy, and Hope Vanbeselaere Marsh for recruiting subjects, conducting the training, and coding videotaped procedures. Thanks are given to Irene Feurer for her consultation on presenting the results and for her and Steve Schilling’s statistical consultation on the growth curve modeling. Special thanks is given to the Susan Gray School, Duncanwood, and Heads Up Early Intervention programs for allowing us to recruit families through their programs and to the families who participated in the study for their cooperation and trust.
This research was supported by NICHD grant RO1HD27594, US Department of Education grant HO23C20152, and NICHD core grant HD15052 (to John F. Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University).
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