Production of English Finite Verb Morphology A Comparison of SLI and Mild-Moderate Hearing Impairment Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Production of English Finite Verb Morphology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtenay Frazier Norbury
    Oxford Study of Children's Communication Impairments University of Oxford Oxford, U.K.
  • Dorothy V. M. Bishop
    Oxford Study of Children's Communication Impairments University of Oxford Oxford, U.K.
  • Josie Briscoe
    Oxford Study of Children's Communication Impairments University of Oxford Oxford, U.K.
  • Contact author: Courtenay Frazier Norbury, MSc, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3UD, U.K. Email: courtenay.norbury@psy.ox.ac.uk
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Production of English Finite Verb Morphology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 165-178. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/015)
History: Received January 3, 2000 , Accepted October 17, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 165-178. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/015)
History: Received January 3, 2000; Accepted October 17, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 107

The performance on production of finite verb morphology of 19 children (ages 5;9–10;7) with mild-moderate sensorineural hearing impairment (SNH) was compared with that of 14 children with specific language impairment (SLI) (ages 7;2–10;9) and age-matched and language-matched control groups. On average, the SNH group outperformed the SLI group and was comparable to controls. However, a subset of the SNH group (n= 6) was impaired on one or both of these tasks. Degree of hearing loss or age of receiving hearing aids was not directly related to performance, but other language measures were. The subset was also significantly younger than the rest of the SNH group, suggesting that acquisition of finite verb morphology may be delayed in children with hearing impairments. Verb regularity had no effect on performance of any group, but word frequency and phonological complexity did exert an influence. The findings are discussed in relation to causative theories of SLI.

Acknowledgments
The research reported here was funded by a grant from the Wellcome Trust awarded to Dorothy Bishop. We would like to thank the staff and pupils at Rose Hill and Donnington Language Resource Bases, Oxford; West Kidlington County Primary School, Oxford; Stockham Primary School, Wantage; and Dawn House School, Nottingham. Dawn House is an I CAN school. I CAN is the national educational charity for children with speech and language impairments. We also extend our appreciation to all of the children and parents who participated in this study. We thank Emma Hayios for her help with data collection, Faith Ayre for assistance with data entry, and Michael Ullman and Heather Van der Lely for access to assessments and word frequency information.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access