Respiratory Markers of Conversational Interaction Respiratory movements were recorded from 10 dyads (20 subjects) during quiet breathing, reading aloud, spontaneous monologue, scripted dialog, and spontaneous conversation. Timing measures of inspiratory, expiratory, and total cycle duration were used to compare respiratory function during quiet breathing, listening, and speech. Cross-correlation analyses of the respiratory movements of conversational ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Respiratory Markers of Conversational Interaction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David H. McFarland
    Faculté de Médecine Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada
  • Contact author: David H. McFarland, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3P 3J7, Canada. Email: david.mcfarland@umontreal.ca
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Respiratory Markers of Conversational Interaction
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 128-143. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/012)
History: Received March 22, 1999 , Accepted October 20, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 128-143. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/012)
History: Received March 22, 1999; Accepted October 20, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 81

Respiratory movements were recorded from 10 dyads (20 subjects) during quiet breathing, reading aloud, spontaneous monologue, scripted dialog, and spontaneous conversation. Timing measures of inspiratory, expiratory, and total cycle duration were used to compare respiratory function during quiet breathing, listening, and speech. Cross-correlation analyses of the respiratory movements of conversational partners provided an index of conversational synchrony. Inspiratory duration was found to be the most consistent and sensitive measure for discriminating quiet breathing from speech breathing. In the scripted dialog and spontaneous conversation conditions, respiratory kinematics changed during listening to more closely resemble speech, and systematic changes were observed in anticipation of turn-taking speech onset. For the breathing cycles immediately surrounding turn changes and simultaneously produced vocal events, the kinematic signals of conversational partners were strongly correlated. Results are discussed in the context of similar findings concerning conversational interactions and motor preparation for speech.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Monique Charest, Mai Diab, Isabelle Faucher, Dominique Garneau, Alexandra Gladu, Anne-Marie Gérin-Lajoie, Phillipe-Antoine Ménard, and Valerie Sylvestre for their assistance in data acquisition and analysis. Thanks also to Margaret Denny, Jenny Hoit, Michael McClean, and Gary Weismer for their insightful and constructive reviews and to other colleagues for their many helpful comments. This work was supported in part by grants from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Fonds pour la Formation de Chercheurs et l’Aide à la Recherche du Québec.
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