Acoustic Comparison of Vowel Articulation in Normal and Reverse Phonation Acoustic characteristics of the vowels /i,u,α/ produced by adult females and males during normal phonation were compared with the same vowels produced on deliberate ingressive airflow (i.e., "reverse" phonation). Results of the analysis revealed the average fundamental frequency (F0) of reverse phonation to be significantly higher than the corresponding normal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Acoustic Comparison of Vowel Articulation in Normal and Reverse Phonation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Robb
    Department of Communication Sciences University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Yang Chen
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Harvey R. Gilbert
    Department of Communication Sciences University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Jay W. Lerman
    Department of Communication Sciences University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Contact author: Michael P. Robb, PhD, Department of Speech & Language Therapy, University of Canterbury, Private Mailbag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand. Email: mrobb@uconn.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    Currently affiliated with the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Acoustic Comparison of Vowel Articulation in Normal and Reverse Phonation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 118-127. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/011)
History: Received April 24, 2000 , Accepted October 13, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2001, Vol. 44, 118-127. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/011)
History: Received April 24, 2000; Accepted October 13, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Acoustic characteristics of the vowels /i,u,α/ produced by adult females and males during normal phonation were compared with the same vowels produced on deliberate ingressive airflow (i.e., "reverse" phonation). Results of the analysis revealed the average fundamental frequency (F0) of reverse phonation to be significantly higher than the corresponding normal phonations. There were no significant differences noted in the vocal tract resonance (F1 and F2 frequency) values for /i/ during normal and reverse phonation. However, the F1 values for /α/ were significantly lower, and the F2 values for /u/ significantly higher, during reverse phonation. The results are discussed with regard to differences in the articulatory control of the speech mechanism during reverse phonation as compared to normal expiratory phonation. Also discussed are the implications of using reverse phonation as a voice management technique.

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