Developmental Phonological Disorders III Long-Term Speech-Sound Normalization Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Developmental Phonological Disorders III
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Frederic A. Gruber
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Lawrence D. Shriberg, PhD, The Phonology Project, The Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wl 53705. E-mail: shriberg@waisman.wisc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Developmental Phonological Disorders III
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1151-1177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1151
History: Received April 6, 1993 , Accepted March 31, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1151-1177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1151
History: Received April 6, 1993; Accepted March 31, 1994

Prior articles in this series provide a descriptive profile of 178 children with developmental phonological disorders (Shriberg & Kwiatkowski, 1994) and predictive correlates of short-term speech-sound normalization in 54 children (Shriberg, Kwiatkowski, & Gruber, 1994). The present article reports findings from a study of 10 children with developmental phonological disorders whose progress was followed at least once yearly for 7 years. Analyses characterize the sequence, rates, and error patterns of long-term speech-sound normalization in relation to developmental perspectives on the nature of children’s phonological disorders. Findings are interpreted to support the hypothesis of a critical period for speech-sound development, with long-term normalization of significant speech delay reaching a chronological age boundary at approximately 8.5 years.

Acknowledgments
We thank each of the persons listed in the acknowledgments in the first article in this series (Shriberg & Kwiatkowski, 1994, p. 1117) for their contributions to the present article as well. We also wish to acknowledge the capable and affable long-term assistance of William Home, who made simultaneous audio-video tapes of each assessment session during the entire 7 years of the study. Finally, our sincere thanks to the children and their parents, who so agreeably fulfilled their parts in a logistically difficult long-term commitment. This work was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Education (G008400633) and the U.S. Public Health Service, NIDCD No. DC00496.
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