A Structured Approach to Voice Range Profile (Phonetogram) Analysis A new method to analyze voice range profiles (phonetograms) is described. The structured analysis is based on quantitatively determining the features: shape, area, and “speaking range” dynamics, without distorting the shape of phonetograms. The parameter sets describing these features are calculated independently of fundamental frequency, which makes it possible to ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 1994
A Structured Approach to Voice Range Profile (Phonetogram) Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arend M. Sulter
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Hero P. Wit
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Harm K. Schutte
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Donald G. Miller
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Contact author: Arend M. Suiter, MD, Ear-Nose-and-Throat Clinic, Voice Research Lab, University Hospital, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands. E-mail: a.sulter@med.rug.nl
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 1994
A Structured Approach to Voice Range Profile (Phonetogram) Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1076-1085. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1076
History: Received January 20, 1994 , Accepted May 5, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1076-1085. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1076
History: Received January 20, 1994; Accepted May 5, 1994

A new method to analyze voice range profiles (phonetograms) is described. The structured analysis is based on quantitatively determining the features: shape, area, and “speaking range” dynamics, without distorting the shape of phonetograms. The parameter sets describing these features are calculated independently of fundamental frequency, which makes it possible to compare phonetograms. Two phonetograms representing a normal and a pathological example are used to illustrate the proposed method. The process provides a tool for establishing normative data for specified groups.

Acknowledgments
We thank Gijs Hasselman for his help in developing software, Geert Suiter for processing phonetograms, Gea de Jong for data management, and Rob van den Brink for his statistical advice. This research project was supported by the Linguistic Research Foundation, which is funded by the Netherlands organization for scientific research, NWO.
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