Long-Term Results of an Intensive Treatment Program for Adults and Adolescents Who Stutter In order to determine the long-term effects of an intensive treatment program, 17 adult and 25 adolescent stutterers were tested 2 or 3 times during a 12- to 24-month post-intensive treatment phase. The results of this study are intended to augment and supplement the growing body of evidence about the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Long-Term Results of an Intensive Treatment Program for Adults and Adolescents Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Einer Boberg
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Deborah Kully
    Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Contact author: Einer Boberg, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 2–70 Corbett Hall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G4 Canada.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Long-Term Results of an Intensive Treatment Program for Adults and Adolescents Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1050-1059. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1050
History: Received April 30, 1993 , Accepted May 3, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1050-1059. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1050
History: Received April 30, 1993; Accepted May 3, 1994

In order to determine the long-term effects of an intensive treatment program, 17 adult and 25 adolescent stutterers were tested 2 or 3 times during a 12- to 24-month post-intensive treatment phase. The results of this study are intended to augment and supplement the growing body of evidence about the effects of intensive treatment programs on adult and adolescent stutterers. Follow-up measures included surprise phone calls to clients at home/work and a self-administered Speech Performance Questionnaire. Careful training of speech raters was undertaken to ensure high reliability of speech measures. Results from the phone call samples indicated that about 69% of the subjects maintained a satisfactory level of post-treatment fluency, with an additional 7% maintaining a level that was judged to be marginally satisfactory. On the self-administered Questionnaire, 80% of the subjects rated their speech fluency as good or fair 12 to 24 months after treatment.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the M.S.I. Foundation of Edmonton, Alberta. The authors would also like to thank Roger Ingham for many helpful editorial suggestions.
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