Human Perioral Muscle Activation Patterns Task-dependent human motor organization in the perioral region was examined in eight normal adults who performed oral tasks including lip protrusion, chewing, and speech. Zero phase-lag correlations among EMG signals recorded from quadrants surrounding the lips were calculated in order to determine patterns of motor coupling. Results indicated that the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Human Perioral Muscle Activation Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy B. Wohlert
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Lisa Goffman
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: A. Wohlert, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: wohlert@sage.cc.purdue.edu
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Human Perioral Muscle Activation Patterns
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1032-1040. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1032
History: Received November 29, 1993 , Accepted April 18, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1032-1040. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1032
History: Received November 29, 1993; Accepted April 18, 1994

Task-dependent human motor organization in the perioral region was examined in eight normal adults who performed oral tasks including lip protrusion, chewing, and speech. Zero phase-lag correlations among EMG signals recorded from quadrants surrounding the lips were calculated in order to determine patterns of motor coupling. Results indicated that the perioral musculature is flexible in output organization. Activv in all quadrants was highly positively correlated during the protrusion task. During the chewing task, correlations were moderate, with a stronger pattern bilaterally across the upper and lower lips. The speech tasks showed lower levels of correlation among the quadrants, but again the pattern was more highly correlated bilaterally than ipsilaterally. Results are compared to studies of oral muscle innervation in humans and animals and also are related to hypotheses of cortical control patterns for oral movement.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grant DC01945-02 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors thank Anne Smith for her assistance in all stages of this project.
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