Evaluation of a Reiterant Force-Impulse Task in the Tongue In the current study characteristics of a lingual force-impulse task were examined. In the task, neurologically normal adults were required to produce sequences of lingual force impulses that were modeled on sequences of syllables produced as reiterant speech. The goal of data analysis was to (a) compare the timing of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Evaluation of a Reiterant Force-Impulse Task in the Tongue
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Bunton
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Gary Weismer
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Gary Weismer, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, 1975 Willow Drive, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wl 53706.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Evaluation of a Reiterant Force-Impulse Task in the Tongue
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1020-1031. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1020
History: Received September 15, 1993 , Accepted April 13, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1020-1031. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1020
History: Received September 15, 1993; Accepted April 13, 1994

In the current study characteristics of a lingual force-impulse task were examined. In the task, neurologically normal adults were required to produce sequences of lingual force impulses that were modeled on sequences of syllables produced as reiterant speech. The goal of data analysis was to (a) compare the timing of the reiterant force sequences to the timing of reiterant speech sequences, (b) compare the force magnitudes to expected force variations associated with linguistic stress in the reiterant speech sequences, and (c) compare the reiterant force magnitudes to maximum lingual forces. Results indicated that reiterant force timing is typically slower than reiterant speech timing, that reiterant force magnitudes do not vary systematically as a function of stress variations in the reiterant speech utterances, and that reiterant force magnitudes are typically only a fraction of maximum lingual forces. Results are discussed in terms of the relationship between orofacial, nonspeech motor performance and speech production performance.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was supported in part by NIDCD R01 DC00319; we are grateful for that support. We would like to thank Kris Tjaden and Julie Liss for helpful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Eric Müller, scientist, colleague, and friend extraordinaire.
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