Dependence of Phonatory Effort on Hydration Level In this study, a double-blind placebo-controlled approach was used to assess the relation between hydration level and phonatory effort. Twelve adult, untrained voice users with normal voices participated as subjects. Each subject received a 4-hour hydration treatment, a 4-hour dehydration treatment, and a 4-hour placebo (control) treatment. Following each treatment, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1994
Dependence of Phonatory Effort on Hydration Level
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine Verdolini
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Ingo R. Titze
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa, Iowa City Recording and Research Center Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
  • Ann Fennell
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Katherine Verdolini, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242. E-mail: verdolini@wjshcpo-shc.uiowa.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1994
Dependence of Phonatory Effort on Hydration Level
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1001-1007. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1001
History: Received February 2, 1993 , Accepted March 28, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1994, Vol. 37, 1001-1007. doi:10.1044/jshr.3705.1001
History: Received February 2, 1993; Accepted March 28, 1994

In this study, a double-blind placebo-controlled approach was used to assess the relation between hydration level and phonatory effort. Twelve adult, untrained voice users with normal voices participated as subjects. Each subject received a 4-hour hydration treatment, a 4-hour dehydration treatment, and a 4-hour placebo (control) treatment. Following each treatment, phonatory effort was measured with a physiological measure, phonation threshold pressure (PTP), and with a psychological measure, direct magnitude estimation of perceived phonatory effort (DMEPPE). Summarizing the results across these measures, the findings indicated an inverse relation between phonatory effort and hydration level, but primarily for high-pitched phonation tasks. The findings for PTPs replicated those from an earlier study conducted without double-blind experimental manipulations (Verdolini-Marston, Titze, & Druker, 1990). Theoretical discussion focuses on the possible role of vocal fold tissue viscosity for hydration and dehydration effects, although direct measures of tissue viscosity are lacking.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Grant No. P60 DC00976 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors acknowledge Carl Gisolfi, Jerry Moon, Jim Ryan, Marty Milder, Eileen Finnegan, Julie Lemke, and Linnie Southard for technical support. Hani Samawi is thanked for assistance with statistical management of the data. Gail Kempster and Kenneth Moll are thanked for their valuable comments on earlier versions of this manuscript.
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