Disfluency and Time Perception Stuttering is manifested as a disruption in speech timing, but it may stem from a more basic temporal disorder (R. D. Kent, 1984). We compared the ability of stuttering and nonstuttering adults to estimate protensity and to distinguish the relative lengths of short tones. We also examined whether there is ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2000
Disfluency and Time Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles T. Barasch
    University of Vermont Burlington
  • Barry Guitar
    University of Vermont Burlington
  • Rebecca J. McCauley
    University of Vermont Burlington
  • Richard G. Absher
    University of Vermont Burlington
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: chandran@together.net
  • Contact author: Charles T. Barasch, University of Vermont, Department of Communication Sciences, Pomeroy Hall, Burlington, VT 05401. Email: chandran@together.net
    Contact author: Charles T. Barasch, University of Vermont, Department of Communication Sciences, Pomeroy Hall, Burlington, VT 05401. Email: chandran@together.net×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2000
Disfluency and Time Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1429-1439. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1429
History: Received May 25, 1999 , Accepted March 14, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1429-1439. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1429
History: Received May 25, 1999; Accepted March 14, 2000

Stuttering is manifested as a disruption in speech timing, but it may stem from a more basic temporal disorder (R. D. Kent, 1984). We compared the ability of stuttering and nonstuttering adults to estimate protensity and to distinguish the relative lengths of short tones. We also examined whether there is a correlation between a person's degree of disfluency and the ability to measure protensity or judge the relative lengths of short tones. Twenty stuttering and 20 nonstuttering adults were given the Duration Pattern Sequence Test. They were also asked to estimate the lengths of 8 tones and silent intervals. A negative correlation was found between degree of disfluency and ability to determine the relative lengths of short tones. A positive correlation was found between degree of disfluency and length of protensity estimates.

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