Verb and Noun Morphology in the Spoken and Written Language of Children With Language Learning Disabilities The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of verb and noun morphology in school-age children's spoken and written language. Sixty children, with and without language learning disabilities (LLD), each produced 2 spoken and 2 written language samples. The children's accuracy in using morphemes that mark verb finiteness ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2000
Verb and Noun Morphology in the Spoken and Written Language of Children With Language Learning Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Windsor
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Cheryl M. Scott
    Oklahoma State University Stillwater
  • Cheryl K. Street
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: windsor@umn.edu
  • Contact author: Jennifer Windsor, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Email: windsor@umn.edu
    Contact author: Jennifer Windsor, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Email: windsor@umn.edu×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2000
Verb and Noun Morphology in the Spoken and Written Language of Children With Language Learning Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1322-1336. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1322
History: Received January 28, 2000 , Accepted July 28, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1322-1336. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1322
History: Received January 28, 2000; Accepted July 28, 2000

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of verb and noun morphology in school-age children's spoken and written language. Sixty children, with and without language learning disabilities (LLD), each produced 2 spoken and 2 written language samples. The children's accuracy in using morphemes that mark verb finiteness (regular past tense, 3rd person singular present tense, copula, and auxiliary BE) was compared with their accuracy in using noun morphology (regular plural, possessive, articles). As would be expected, the typically achieving children, who were aged 7 to 12 years, had mastered the verb and noun morphology in spoken and written samples. The children with LLD, aged 10 to 12 years, also showed high accuracy in the spoken samples. On the other hand, they showed substantial difficulty in the written samples with the regular past tense, with errors in 26% of obligatory contexts. However, the children with LLD also had difficulty with the regular plural, with errors in 12% of obligatory contexts. For both the regular past tense and plural, all errors were errors of omission. These results indicate that finiteness marking remains an area of relative difficulty, but perhaps not the only grammatical difficulty, for children with language impairments in the school years.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants to the first author from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R29-DC02402, R01 DC04437). Grateful thanks are extended to Jill Markon, Rochelle Milbrath, and Susan Rakowski for carrying out the error coding and reliability measures.
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