Lexical, Syntactic, and Stress-Pattern Cues for Speech Segmentation Many sources of segmentation information are available in speech. Previous research has shown that one or another segmentation cue is used by listeners under certain circumstances. However, it has also been shown that none of the cues are absolutely reliable. Therefore, it is likely that people use a combination of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 2000
Lexical, Syntactic, and Stress-Pattern Cues for Speech Segmentation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa D. Sanders
    University of Oregon Eugene
  • Helen J. Neville
    University of Oregon Eugene
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 2000
Lexical, Syntactic, and Stress-Pattern Cues for Speech Segmentation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1301-1321. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1301
History: Received April 28, 2000 , Accepted July 17, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2000, Vol. 43, 1301-1321. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4306.1301
History: Received April 28, 2000; Accepted July 17, 2000

Many sources of segmentation information are available in speech. Previous research has shown that one or another segmentation cue is used by listeners under certain circumstances. However, it has also been shown that none of the cues are absolutely reliable. Therefore, it is likely that people use a combination of segmentation cues when listening to normal speech. This study addresses the issue of how young adults use multiple segmentation cues (lexical, syntactic, and stress-pattern) in combination to break up continuous speech. Evidence that people use more than one cue at a time was found. Furthermore, the results suggest that people can use segmentation cues flexibly such that remaining cues are relied upon more heavily when other information is missing.

Acknowledgments
This research was presented, in part, as a poster entitled “Speech Segmentation by Bilingual Speakers” at the 1998 meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society in San Francisco. The research was supported by NIH, NIDCD Grant DC000128. The authors wish to thank Dr. Douglas L. Hintzman and Dr. Susan Guion for their helpful comments in preparing this manuscript.
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