Parental Perceptions of Children's Communicative Development at Stuttering Onset There has been clinical speculation that parents of young stuttering children have expectations of their children's communication abilities that are not well-matched to the children's actual skills. We appraised the language abilities of 15 children close to the onset of stuttering symptoms and 15 age-, sex-, and SES-matched fluent children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2000
Parental Perceptions of Children's Communicative Development at Stuttering Onset
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Stacy Silverman
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Contact author: Nan Bernstein Ratner, PhD, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, The University of Maryland, College Park, 0100 Lefrak Hall, College Park, MD 20742. Email: nratner@hesp.umd.edu
    Contact author: Nan Bernstein Ratner, PhD, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, The University of Maryland, College Park, 0100 Lefrak Hall, College Park, MD 20742. Email: nratner@hesp.umd.edu×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: nratner@hesp.umd.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2000
Parental Perceptions of Children's Communicative Development at Stuttering Onset
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1252-1263. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1252
History: Received August 23, 1999 , Accepted March 6, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1252-1263. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1252
History: Received August 23, 1999; Accepted March 6, 2000

There has been clinical speculation that parents of young stuttering children have expectations of their children's communication abilities that are not well-matched to the children's actual skills. We appraised the language abilities of 15 children close to the onset of stuttering symptoms and 15 age-, sex-, and SES-matched fluent children using an array of standardized tests and spontaneous language sample measures. Parents concurrently completed two parent-report measures of the children's communicative development. Results indicated generally depressed performance on all child speech and language measures by the children who stutter. Parent report was closely attuned to child performance for the stuttering children; parents of nonstuttering children were less accurate in their predictions of children's communicative performance. Implications for clinical advisement to parents of stuttering children are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank the families and children who participated in this study and to acknowledge the help of Carrie Bain, Mary Kate Lotto, and Stephanie Miles in data collection and analysis.
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